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Search Results for 'statism five images'

It’s been almost three months since I shared some satiric images about government. So let’s rectify that oversight with five new items. We’ll start with some very wise words from Forest Gump (not the imposter). The second item in today’s collection sort of reminds me of this “shovel” cartoon about Keynesian economics. Both involve pointless […]

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One week ago, I shared five images that capture the essence of government. Today, we have another collection, starting with a reminder of, in the words of Ronald Reagan, the most terrifying words in the English language. Next, we have warning signs about all sorts of things, but not about the the biggest threat we […]

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As a wonk, I prefer serious criticisms of government that focus on excessive spending, punitive tax rates, and pointless red tape. But since I’ve never grown up, I also appreciate humor that mocks government. So let’s enjoy a new collection of memes that target our overlords in Washington (these also apply to the politicians and […]

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Back in 2018, I shared five images that accurately capture leftism, which is the Mussolini-ish notion of “All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state” (one of the images was subsequently deleted, so you can enjoy this column if you want five of them). Today, we’re going to look at five […]

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Last month, we summarized libertarianism in five images. In the interest of fairness, now let’s give equal time to the other side. After all, statists deserve an opportunity to present their case. And we’ll start with this image, which makes the same point about coercion found in the “two-sentences” column I shared two months ago. […]

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Government in Cartoons and Images

I’ve always enjoyed cartoons that portray the state as a blundering, often-malicious, overweight nitwit, so I figured I should amass these gems in one place. * Big government at a lunch counter, courtesy of Lisa Benson. * It’s a bird, it’s a plane….it’s Government Man, courtesy of Jim McKee. * Big government, as represented by […]

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Politicians are not necessarily or automatically evil. Instead, they screw up in large part because of perverse incentives. That being said, they should be mocked rather than admired (with St. Ronald being the obvious exception). With that in mind, let’s enjoy another edition of politician humor. We’ll start with a potential fringe benefit of facial […]

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Since I’ve recently shared two examples (here and here) of “statism in pictures,” it’s time for a libertarian version. Our first image is near and dear to my heart. Sadly, the Supreme Court sometimes doesn’t fulfill its job of keeping government within the Constitution. Especially with regard to enumerated powers. Next, this cartoon does a […]

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Since yesterday’s column showed “Statism in Five Images,” I feel obliged to provide equal time and now do the same thing for libertarianism. We’ll start with an accurate depiction of how libertarians compare to other ideologies (similar to the triangle I created back in 2019). If you prefer a shorter way of describing libertarians, this […]

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Since libertarians are motivated by the non-aggression principle, it’s easy to understand why they support the capitalist system of voluntary exchange rather than alternative systems based on government coercion. But there are some who think markets are immoral, and that’s the topic of this book and this related video. Virgil Henry Storr and Ginny Seung […]

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In early September, I wrote about how capital and labor are both necessary to create prosperity. Economists sometimes explain this with lots of jargon, referring to capital and labor as “factors of production” and pointing out how they are “complementary.” In ordinary English, this simply means that workers earn more income when they are equipped […]

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I spend much of my time analyzing the foolish and counterproductive policies imposed by Washington. Often accompanied by some mockery of politicians and their silly laws. And I also employ the same approach when reviewing the bone-headed policies often pursued by state governments and local governments. And since this is “International Liberty,” I obviously like […]

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I’ve written many times about socialism, which is sometimes a frustrating task because the definition is slippery. I suspect the average supporter of Bernie Sanders or Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez thinks that socialism is big government, with lots of handouts financed by class warfare taxation. Since that’s the common perception, is that the definition we should use? […]

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I wrote last week about evil of totalitarian ideologies such as communism and fascism and pointed out that both antifa and Nazis should be treated with complete disdain and ostracism. And that led me to find common ground with my left-of-center friends, even though I don’t like many of their policies. I don’t like redistribution…programs […]

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Back in April, I looked at the candidates running for the French presidency and half-jokingly wondered which one would win the right to preside over the country’s decline. But once the field was winnowed to two candidates, Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen, I wrote that voters should pick the socialist over the socialist. My […]

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Nations usually don’t suffer overnight economic collapse. Indeed, Adam Smith was right about the ability of a country to survive and withstand lots of bad public policy. But at some point, as a nation gravitates in the wrong direction on the statism spectrum, it goes from prosperity to stagnation to decline. Which is sort of what […]

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The last time there was a presidential election in France, I like to think my endorsement made a difference in the outcome. Now that another election is about to take place, with a first round this Sunday and a runoff election between the top-2 candidates two week later, it’s time to once again pontificate about […]

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The famous French diplomat Charles Maurice de Talleyrand supposedly said that a weakness of the Bourbon monarchs was that they learned nothing and forgot nothing. If so, the genetic descendants of the Bourbons are now in charge of Europe. But before explaining why, let’s first establish that Europe is in trouble. I’ve made that point […]

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While economists are famous for their disagreements (and their incompetent forecasts), there is universal consensus in the profession that demand curves slope downward. That may be meaningless jargon to non-economists, but it simply means that people buy less of something when it becomes more expensive. And this is why it makes no sense to impose […]

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European economic analysts are paying too much attention to the United Kingdom and too little attention to Italy. Yes, the Brexit decision is important, and the United Kingdom is the world’s 5th-largest economy so it merits attention to see if there are any speed bumps as it escapes from the slowly sinking ship otherwise known […]

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The United Kingdom is getting a lot of attention because voters just chose to leave the European Union. I think this was the smart choice. Yes, there will be some short-run economic volatility, but the long-run benefits should make it worthwhile. Sort of like chemotherapy being painful, but still being much better than the alternative […]

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According to Economic Freedom of the World, there are five major factors that determine a nation’s economic performance. Here’s the recipe for growth and prosperity. Rule of law and property rights. Small government. Stable monetary policy. Reasonable regulatory policy. Free trade. This great publication is the first thing I check when I want to see […]

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The debate over socialism shouldn’t even exist. Everywhere big government has been tried, it has failed. And we have reams of evidence that free-market economies dramatically out-perform statist economies. Yet the siren song of socialism still appeals to a subsection of the population, either because of naiveté or an unseemly lust to exercise power over […]

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What’s the greatest economic tragedy in modern history? The obvious answer is communism, which produced tens of millions of needless deaths and untold misery for ordinary people. Just compare living standards in North Korea and South Korea, or Chile and Cuba. But if there was a second-place prize for the world’s biggest economic failure, Argentina […]

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Like a lot of libertarians and small-government conservatives, I’m prone to pessimism. How can you be cheerful, after all, when you look at what’s been happening in our lifetimes. New entitlement programs, adopted by politicians from all parties, are further adding to the long-run spending crisis. The federal budget has become much bigger, luring millions […]

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When I wrote last week about “societal capital” as a key determinant of long-run prosperity, I didn’t realize I would generate a lot of feedback. Including several requests for more information. Which creates a small problem since the field is so large that it’s difficult to provide an overview. If people were asking questions on […]

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Have you ever wondered why, in a hypothetical match-up, the American people would elect Ronald Reagan over Barack Obama in a landslide? And have you ever wondered why Americans rate Reagan as the best post-WWII President and put Obama in last place? There are probably a couple of reasons for these polling numbers, but I […]

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Some things in life are very dependable. Every year, for instance, the swallows return to Capistrano. And you can also count on Dan Mitchell to wax poetic about the looming collapse of French statism. Back in 2011, I said France was engaged in economic self-destruction. In September 2012, I wrote that it was time to […]

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I don’t like giving international bureaucrats tax-free salaries. And it really galls me when they use their privileged positions to promote statism. So you can understand why I’m not a big fan of the International Monetary Fund. Whether we’re talking more spending, more taxes, more bailouts, or more centralization and harmonization, it seems that the […]

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Several months ago, I wrote a rather wonky post explaining that the western world became rich in large part because of jurisdictional competition. Citing historians, philosophers, economists, and other great thinkers, I explained that the rivalry made possible by decentralization and diversity played a big role in both economic and political liberalization. In other words, […]

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