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Archive for December 6th, 2020

I asked a couple of years ago, “How long can California survive big government?”

Based on migration patterns, the answer is “Not much longer.” Simply stated, bad fiscal and regulatory policy have produced a long-run decline for the Golden State. So we shouldn’t be surprised that people are fleeing.

And it appears Californians like escaping to Texas, a state with no personal or corporate income tax.

I’ve written several times about the divergent performance of the two states.

So let’s make today’s column the sixth edition of Texas vs. California.

We’ll start with a column in the Wall Street Journal by Joe Lonsdale, a venture capitalist who explains why he and his company are moving to Texas.

I love California…and have spent most of my adult life in the San Francisco Bay Area, founding technology companies like Palantir and Addepar and investing in many others. In 2011 I founded 8VC, a venture-capital firm that today manages more than $3.6 billion in committed capital. …I am moving myself and dozens of my 8VC colleagues to a new land of opportunity: Texas. The harsh truth is that California has fallen into disrepair. Bad policies discourage business and innovation, stifle opportunity and make life in major cities ugly and unpleasant. …That’s not all. The California government is beholden to public-employee unions and spending is out of control. A broken environmental review process means it takes a decade of paying lawyers to build anything. Legislation makes it impossible for businesses to hire contractors without an exemption—granted by friends in the legislature, as with the music industry, or won by spending hundreds of millions on a referendum, as gig-economy companies with drivers just did. This isn’t how business is done in developed countries. …It’s tragic that California is no longer hospitable to that mission, but beautiful that Texas is. Our job as entrepreneurs and investors is to build the future, and I know of no better place to do so than Texas.

In a report for CNBC, Ari Levy and Lora Kolodny write about Elon Musk’s looming escape to the Lone Star State.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk put his California houses on the market this year while he was sparring with state lawmakers over Covid-19 restrictions. He’s simultaneously been expanding operations in Texas and cozying up to Republican Gov. Greg Abbott. Now, several of his close friends and associates say that Musk has told them he’s planning to move to the Lone Star State. …California, often condemned by the super rich for its high tax rates and stiff regulations, has seen an exodus of notable tech names… In May, as businesses across California were forced to remain closed because of the pandemic, Musk tweeted that he was moving Tesla’s headquarters and future development from California to Texas and Nevada. Getting out of California, with the highest income tax in the country, and into Texas, which has no state income tax, could save Musk billions of dollars.

Meanwhile, Hewlett Packard already has made the move, as reported by the Associated Press.

Tech giant Hewlett Packard Enterprise said it is moving its global headquarters to the Houston area from California, where the company’s roots go back to the founding of Silicon Valley decades ago. …”As we look to the future, our business needs, opportunities for cost savings, and team members’ preferences about the future of work, we are excited to relocate HPE’s headquarters to the Houston region,” CEO Antonio Neri said in a written statement… moving out of Northern California is a loss, at least symbolically, for the tech industry that electronics pioneers William Hewlett and David Packard helped start in a Palo Alto garage in 1939. A plaque outside the home where they worked on their first product, an audio oscillator, calls it the birthplace of Silicon Valley, the “world’s first high-technology region.”

To be sure, the three stories shared above are anecdotes.

But if you look at comprehensive data on both people and income, there’s a very clear pattern. Simply stated, Texas is winning and California is losing.

No, this doesn’t mean Texas is perfect. Or that California is always bad (it’s much better than Texas with regards to asset forfeiture, for instance).

But it’s hard to feel much optimism about the Golden State.

P.S. My favorite California-themed jokes (not counting the state’s elected officials) can be found hereherehere, and here. And here’s some tongue-in-cheek advice for California from the recently departed Walter Williams.

P.P.S. If you prefer comparisons of New York and Florida, click here, here, here, and here.

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