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Archive for February 8th, 2012

When Obama argued the other day that he favored higher taxes and more redistribution because of his Christian beliefs, I was tempted to repeat something I wrote last year to draw the distinction between private charity and government coercion.

I’m glad I resisted temptation, because I received a much more entertaining response in my inbox today. Enjoy this rewrite of Psalm 23.

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Psalm 2012

Obama Is the shepherd I did not want.
He leadeth me
Beside the still factories.

He restoreth my faith in the Republican party.
He guideth me in the path of unemployment for his party’s sake.

Yea, Though I walk through the valley of the bread line,
I shall fear no hunger, for his bailouts are with me.

He has Anointed my income with taxes,
My expenses runneth over.

Surely, poverty and hard living will follow me all the days of my life,
And I will live in a mortgaged home forever.

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Given the shortcomings of Newt GingrichRick Santorum, and Mitt Romney, I don’t like the part of about restoring “faith in the Republican Party.”

But that’s nit-picking. Kudos to the person who put this together. Very well done.

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I’ve written before about the importance of getting rid of the Department of Transportation, and I’ve also written about Republicans getting in bed with big government.

So you can imagine how agitated I was to read this article about transportation spending at National Review. Written by Andrew McCarthy, it shows that the GOP still has a long way to go before cleansing themselves of the big-government corruption of the Bush-Rove years. Here are some nauseating passages.

The problem is not the GOP infighting. The problem is the GOP. Republicans are simply not interested in limiting government or addressing our death spiral of spending. …The federal government should not be in the transportation business at all. A federal role was rationalized in the mid-Fifties to finance the construction of interstate highways. As National Review’s editors observed in 2005, that project was completed in the early Eighties, at which time the fuel tax that funded it should have been repealed and the upkeep of highways left to the states. “Instead,” they wrote, “Congress morphed the program into a slush fund for some of its most indefensible pork-barrel spending.” …see how easily a “highway system” morphs into a “transportation system.” The taxes that Leviathan confiscates from drivers, purportedly for road construction and maintenance, are actually redistributed to subsidize other forms of transit preferred by progressives — including walking. For that, you can thank Republicans. With a compassionate wink from President Bush, the Republican Congress enacted an obscene $286.5 billion transportation bill in 2005… SAFETEA-LU featured all the uglies that outraged voters into telling the GOP to take a hike in the 2006 and 2008 elections. These included Alaska’s infamous $250 million “Bridge to Nowhere,” one of the bill’s 6,376 earmarks totaling $24 billion — you know, the sorts of budget-busting recklessness Republicans promised us they’d sworn off in order to get elected in 2010. …And now that the “Pledge to America” crowd that promised to stop the madness is back in charge, what do you suppose the plan is? Why, to persist in the madness. Team Boehner, whose “pledge” to voters explicitly promised “to stop out-of-control spending and reduce the size of government,” proposes to continue funding transportation at “current levels” for the next five years, which translates to an additional budget shortfall of about $60 billion dollars. So much for decrying “Washington Democrats [who] refuse to listen to the American people and eliminate, restrain, or even budget for their out-of-control spending spree.” …Naturally, conservatives who expected Republicans to do what they promised are apt to go ballistic. So, just as in the debt-ceiling fiasco, the establishment’s plan is to dazzle the rubes with some smoke-and-mirrors. On the debt ceiling, it was phantom cuts that would occur, um, someday. This time around it is a commitment to ramp up oil and gas production, the additional revenues from which, we’re told, will alleviate the transportation burden. …The brute fact is that today’s Republican establishment does not believe in limited government. “Limited government” is a slogan reserved for campaigns and fund-raising drives. The idea is not to rein in big government; it’s to hold the reins of big government.

Amen. Every time someone posts a comment or sends an email to complain that I’m too mean to GOPers, they should read this column. Principles should come first, not the self interest of a political party filled with corrupt hacks.

Yes, I realize that “corrupt hacks” is a bit unfair and over the top. After all, these are the folks who voted last year for real entitlement reform, so I need to remind myself that politicians are combinations of good and bad.

But this transportation bill shows what happens when the bad part is running amok.

And it teaches us a lesson that it is not progress to replace big-spending Democrats with big-spending Republicans.

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