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Archive for January 25th, 2011

I’d much rather be watching the Georgia-Florida basketball game, but my oppressive and exploitative overlords at the Cato Institute are making me come back to DC this evening to “live-blog” the President’s speech tonight.

Several of my colleagues will be joining me in this exercise. If you want to follow our collective (but not collectivist) analysis, click here.

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I’m disappointed, but not surprised, to read in the Washington Post that President Obama has decided against any changes to restrain Social Security spending. He’ll still probably subject us to pious and insincere rhetoric about fighting red ink in tonight’s State-of-the-Union address, but it is very revealing that the President is rejecting even the recommendations of his hand-picked Commission.

More than two months after his deficit commission first laid out a plan for reining in the national debt, President Obama has yet to embrace any of its controversial provisions – and he is unlikely to break that silence Tuesday night. …the president’s decision not to lay out his own vision for reducing the national debt has infuriated balanced-budget advocates, who fear that a bipartisan consensus for action fostered last month by Obama’s commission could wither without presidential leadership. …Liberals…applauded the decision, arguing that Social Security cuts are neither necessary to reduce current deficits nor a wise move politically.

I won’t be surprised, though, if Obama proposes in his budget to increase the Social Security payroll tax burden. That’s an idea he endorsed during the 2008 campaign.

The right approach, by the way, is not just cutting benefits, but rather letting younger workers shift their payroll taxes into personal retirement accounts, as explained in this video that was released earlier this month.

But the President’s reluctance to touch Social Security is only part of the story. The White House actually intends to push for more government spending. Only they won’t phrase it that way. The President will claim the new spending is an “investment.” But Senator Durbin of Illinois committed a gaffe and admitted this is just a repeat of the failed stimulus.

“It’s part of a stimulus. but we’re sensitive to the deficit,” Durbin said on “Fox News Sunday” when asked by host Chris Wallace about the president’s expected plans to call for more spending for infrastructure, education, research in his State of the Union address Tuesday night to a joint session of Congress.

I’m not sure why people are talking about a new, centrist-oriented Obama. Recycling big-government proposals is hardly a sign of fiscal restraint. And ducking-and-running on entitlements hardly seems to indicate a new era of fiscal responsibility.

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I’ve written several times about Hoover and Roosevelt causing/deepening/lengthening the Great Depression with their tax-and-spend, interventionist policies (see here, here, here, here, here, here, and here). But I’ve only once waded into the deeper economic issues. But a new column by Robert Higgs (h/t, Don Boudreaux) has motivated me to give some well-deserved attention to Austrian economic theory.

As you can see in the excerpt below, Higgs succinctly explains that understanding the works of scholars such as Hayek and Mises is necessary if we want people to truly understand why Keynesianism doesn’t work. Higgs also cites two excellent articles (here and here) by my former grad school colleague, Steve Horwitz, for those who want a head start on grasping these issues.

Misunderstanding the Great Depression has caused much mischief in modern macroeconomics and, more important, in government fiscal and monetary policies based on or influenced by this faulty understanding. If we are ever to arrive at a sound understanding of the Depression, we will have to persuade the economics profession to take Austrian economics seriously, as most economists did before the publication of Keynes’s magnum opus in 1936. Keynesianism in particular has proven itself to be a fundamentally flawed mode of analysis, yet one that has survived, evolved, and—like the zombies in the film “Night of the Living Dead”—keeps coming back, no matter how many times anti-Keynesians credit themselves with having dealt it a fatal blow. Monetarist, New Classical, and other recent critiques have themselves been inadequate or indefensible in various ways, as well.

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