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Archive for May 22nd, 2010

We’ve looked at this issue before, but this new CNN article fleshes out the awful IRS rules in the new healthcare bill:

The massive expansion of requirements for businesses to file 1099 tax forms that was hidden in the 2,409-page health reform bill took many by surprise when it came to light last month. …The result: A blizzard of new tax forms that the Internal Revenue Service will begin rolling out next year. …Starting in 2011, financial firms that process credit or debit card payments will be required to send their clients, and the IRS, an annual form documenting the year’s transactions. …The 1099 changes attached to the health care reform bill are another kettle of fish. These massively expand the requirements for filing the “1099-Misc” form, which companies use for recording payments to freelance workers and other individual service providers. Until now, payments to corporations have been exempt from 1099 rules, as have payments for the purchase of goods. Starting in 2012, that changes. All business payments or purchases that exceed $600 in a calendar year will need to be accompanied by a 1099 filing. That means obtaining the taxpayer ID number of the individual or corporation you’re making the payment to — even if it’s a giant retailer like Staples or Best Buy — at the time of the transaction, or else facing IRS penalties. …SMC’s survey found that extending 1099s just to services purchased from corporations would push that number to at least 200 filings per year for a typical small business — adding an estimated $6,000 to the cost of preparing the average tax return. And that’s without even accounting for the requirement that 1099s be filed for purchases of goods, a provision that Henschke’s group didn’t see coming when it conducted its survey last year. “These folks are doing their paperwork in the evenings and on the weekends already,” he says. “This certainly adds to the burden substantially.”

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I don’t really have much to say about the conference in Belgrade. I’ve been giving the same speech over and over again. Each audience is hearing it for the first time, but I’m boring myself. Like many cities in former communist nations, Belgrade is a bit run down, but the Danube is an impressive river, and here’s a photo of an old fortress at the key intersection of the Danube and Sava rivers.

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I have a question for my friends who support a national sales tax. First, some background. Beginning with the defeat of Woody Jenkins in his Louisiana Senate race back in the 1990s, various versions of the national sales tax have caused political headaches for GOP candidates. Even candidates from conservative states, such as Sen. DeMint in South Carolina, have been put on the defensive because they said good things about the FairTax. The latest example comes from the Pennsylvania special election for Rep. Murtha’s seat. As this Wall Street Journal column points out, the winning Democratic candidate hammered the Republican because of his support for the FairTax. So even though I have said very nice things about a national sales tax, testified about the virtues of the national sales tax, and debated in favor of a national sales tax over the current system, I am increasingly convinced that the flat tax is the only plan that is sufficiently immune to demagoguery. Can anyone give me a persuasive argument about the political viability of the FairTax?

Democrats turned the table and ran against Mr. Burns on taxes. The GOP businessman had flirted in the past with supporting the FAIR tax, a version of a national sales tax that supporters want to replace the income tax. Mr. Critz’s ads blasted Mr. Burns for supporting a 23% sales tax increase without mentioning the income tax elimination, and the GOP seems to have been caught flat-footed. Republicans can rightly complain that this is unfair and that Mr. Critz will vote to raise taxes when Mrs. Pelosi gives the order. But they need a real-time campaign answer to the tax-hike charge. Whatever the merits of the FAIR tax in theory, we’ve long thought it is a political loser because voters figure they’ll get the sales tax without losing the income tax. At a minimum, FAIR tax supporters shouldn’t have left Mr. Burns defenseless on the subject. By the way, this is also a political warning to Republicans inclined to fall for the Democratic trap of agreeing to a new value-added tax in return for lower income-tax rates.

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